Afterword

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On August 15, 2014, Posted by , In Gong Hua, By ,, , With 7 Comments

Originally, I had wanted for Gong Hua to be a trilogy, only three novels. But after I had written around 70 thousand words of the first novel, I found that I had only gotten through a third of the plot I had planned. Because of this, I finally abandoned my plan to end the story in three books.

Unfathomably, Gong Hua had changed into a long story spanning six books, with each book ranging around 100 thousand words. Every two books will make up one part of the trilogy, and will tell the same story. There will be, however, a small ending of sorts between the different parts of the trilogy. At least, that is how I planned it so far.

It can still be considered as a trilogy, right?

I hope I won’t spill anything about the plot in the rest of my afterword.

Gong Hua is a very slow-moving story; it will take time before we reach the main point of the plot. The writing style I’m using for Gong Hua is different from any of the ones I’ve employed before, where I’d get straight to the point of the story. If I have to compare them, the style in Gong Hua is somewhat similar to the one I used for my previous work, Kill No More.

However, the world of Gong Hua is much more complete than the one I made for Kill No More (after all, even a map was drawn for Gong Hua). And because I wanted to clearly describe the things I visualized, I wrote more than I expected, causing my word explosion.

From beginning to end, Gong Hua is a work that rebels against everything I’ve wrote before. This time, I’m .

books are always described to be extremely funny, and that’s it. There is a strong emphasis on character portrayals, which is why the settings of the stories are often incomplete in comparison…

So in writing Gong Hua this time, I put in so many details about the world that even I myself found it too much. Every time, I had to make sure I wrote the necessary parts while preventing myself from tossing out too long of a chapter (because it would be too hard for me to remember the details). Even then, I managed to write out a rather complete description of the world I envisioned. It should be very easy for everyone to find specific passages and references in the story.

But I’ll still have to remind everyone what physical spirits are and what spirit charmers do later on in the story…

Furthermore, I have to incorporate these sorts of explanations in-between character dialogues, rather than writing it straight out in the narration. I dislike that way of writing out explanations.

Adding all these up, writing Gong Hua seriously makes me feel like my head will explode.

However, as I saw Sisha slowly taking on shape… Ah, I felt somewhat akin to God then.

It was very pleasant.

Other parts that rebel against what I’ve previously written:

The circumstances surrounding Gong Hua’s character are rather tragic; practically the moment he shows up, he kills off an entire town of people.

The theme of the first book is revenge…

Other than that, I wrote about love…

In conclusion: the rebellious attitude I have towards myself is a disease beyond cure.

But because of this disease, I can try out many different types of things, even things I’m not familiar with.

Perhaps I am better at describing and writing about things I’m used to. But I want to change the unfamiliar things into things I am familiar with. With this, the contents of my novels can become more enriching and diverse.

I hope I will keep on improving in the future.

I also hope that everyone will accept an unusual child like Gong Hua, who is very different from the main characters of my previous works.

 

Yu Wo

Next: Prologue: The Flower that Feeds on Flesh and Blood
Previous: Chapter 10: A Name Returned, A Past Forever Lost… Gong Hua
Return: Main Page

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Translator: Nannyn
Proofreaders: Syrra, PiKairi

Written as御我 (Yu Wo), same as the author’s name. The meaning of the name is about resisting yourself, hence, why Yu Wo used it here.
Here, the authors uses御我as her name.

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7 Comments so far:

  1. KT says:

    Thank you very much for your work on this!

  2. gonghualover says:

    so is this the end of vol. 1?

  3. xena nais says:

    Thank you for your amazing work:-)

  4. teckie says:

    Ty for everything, yu wo~

    And cookies for everyone who worked to bring us this awesome novel!

    (::) (::) (::) (::) (::) (::) (::) (::)
    -___________________________-

    S s S
    \—-/
    |__| and a glass of warm milk :3

  5. Flitfish says:

    Thank you for your work! I’ve been reading whatever I could find of Yu Who’s works translated online (I tried machine translations for a while but had to give up). Gong Hua is probably my favorite far. Her stories usually enter into an intricate work) serious arcs later. Gong Hua starts off that way. I will look forward to the rest of this trilogy!

  6. snuffie says:

    “The writing style I’m using for Gong Hua is different from any of the ones I’ve employed before, where I’d get straight to the point of the story. If I have to compare them, the style in Gong Hua is somewhat similar to the one I used for my previous work, Kill No More.”

    ….But in Kill No More the story just wanders around without giving the readers a clue of where it’s going in at least the first two volumes…

    “However, as I saw Sisha slowly taking on shape… Ah, I felt somewhat akin to God then. It was very pleasant.”

    This is why I’m her fan.

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